Bài giảng Glencoe World History - Chapter 1 The First Humans, Prehistory-3500 B.C

Tài liệu Bài giảng Glencoe World History - Chapter 1 The First Humans, Prehistory-3500 B.C: Splash ScreenChapter MenuChapter IntroductionSection 1: Early HumansSection 2: The Neolithic RevolutionVisual SummaryChapter Intro What is civilization?These cave paintings in Lascaux, France, illustrate the animals early people hunted 17,000 years ago during the Ice Age. Images like these give us glimpses into the life of early humans. In this chapter, you will learn how humans gradually shifted from temporary to permanent settlements and began establishing civilizations.• How do you think the first humans got their food?• How would you define civilization?Chapter Intro Chapter Intro Chapter Intro 1Early HumansWhat important developments took place in the Paleolithic Age?Chapter Intro 2The Neolithic Revolution and the Rise of CivilizationHow does agriculture affect our society?Chapter Preview-EndSection 1-Main IdeaThe BIG IdeaPhysical Geography Human life developed in different stages over millions of years, and by 10,000 B.C., Homo sapiens sapiens had spread throughout the world.S...

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Splash ScreenChapter MenuChapter IntroductionSection 1: Early HumansSection 2: The Neolithic RevolutionVisual SummaryChapter Intro What is civilization?These cave paintings in Lascaux, France, illustrate the animals early people hunted 17,000 years ago during the Ice Age. Images like these give us glimpses into the life of early humans. In this chapter, you will learn how humans gradually shifted from temporary to permanent settlements and began establishing civilizations.• How do you think the first humans got their food?• How would you define civilization?Chapter Intro Chapter Intro Chapter Intro 1Early HumansWhat important developments took place in the Paleolithic Age?Chapter Intro 2The Neolithic Revolution and the Rise of CivilizationHow does agriculture affect our society?Chapter Preview-EndSection 1-Main IdeaThe BIG IdeaPhysical Geography Human life developed in different stages over millions of years, and by 10,000 B.C., Homo sapiens sapiens had spread throughout the world.Section 1-Key TermsContent Vocabularyprehistory archaeology artifact anthropology fossil hominid Australopithecus Homo sapiens sapiens“out-of-Africa” theoryAcademic VocabularytheorysurviveSection 1-Key TermsPeople and PlacesOlduvai GorgePaleolithic AgeABSection 1-Polling QuestionDo you agree that we have more to learn about our society by understanding early humans?A. YesB. NoSection 1Before HistoryScientists use fossils and artifacts as clues to how early humans lived.Section 1Prehistory is the time before writing was developed.Archaeology is the study of past societies through the analysis of artifacts such as tools, weapons, art, buildings.Anthropology is the study of human life and culture. Anthropologists use artifacts and fossils to create a picture of peoples’ everyday lives.Before History (cont.)Section 1Methods of dating fossils and artifacts:Radiocarbon datingThermo-luminescenceMicroscopic and biological analysis Before History (cont.)Archaeological FindsABCDSection 1On which of the following fossils would radiocarbon dating be useful? A. Dinosaurs B. HumansC. ToolsD. RocksSection 1Early Development Using remains and technology, scientists identify important stages in human development. Section 1Hominids are the earliest humanlike creatures that first appeared in Africa four million years ago and slowly changed over time.Skeletal remains were found by Louis and Mary Leakey at Olduvai Gorge in 1959.Early Development (cont.)Section 1Types of early hominids:Australopithecus: Early Development (cont.)“southern ape”one example was named "Lucy"approximately 3.5 million years oldSection 1Homo habilis: “handy human”lived 2.5 to 1.6 million years agolarger brainmay have used stone toolsEarly Development (cont.)Section 1Homo erectus:“upright human”lived 1.8 million to 100,000 years agofirst hominid to have arms and legs in modern human proportionprobably the first to leave AfricaEarly Development (cont.)Section 1Homo sapiens:“wise human”lived around 100,000 to 200,000 years agorapid brain growthmastered fireEarly Development (cont.)Section 1Neanderthalsdescended from Homo sapiens lived around 100,000 years ago to 30,000 years agomade clothes from animal skins and buried their deadEarly Development (cont.)Section 1Homo sapiens sapiens: “wise, wise human”also descended from Homo sapiens appeared in Africa between 150,000 and 200,000 years agofirst to have modern anatomyEarly Development (cont.)Section 1spread around the globe around 100,000 years ago in search of food and hunting grounds, replacing populations in Europe and Asia (“out-of-Africa” theory)all human life belongs to this subgroup of human beingsEarly Development (cont.)ABCDSection 1Which of the following groups of hominids are ordered from those that developed the earliest to those that developed the most recently?A. Neanderthal, Homo sapiens, Homo habilis, Homo erectus B. Homo habilis, Homo sapiens, Neanderthal, Homo erectus C. Homo habilis, Homo erectus, Homo sapiens, Neanderthal D. Homo habilis, Neanderthal, Homo erectus, Homo sapiens Section 1The Paleolithic AgeEarly humans used fire, made tools, and adapted to survive. Section 1The Paleolithic Age refers to the early period of history when humans used stone tools. Paleolithic people were hunter-gatherers who lived a nomadic lifestyle. They made tools, clothing, shelter, and fire.The roles of men and women were probably considered equal due to the division of labor. The Paleolithic Age (cont.)Section 1The ability to start fire helped Paleolithic humans spread farther around the globe including to colder climates. Art found in caves around the world shows its importance to early humans. The Paleolithic Age (cont.)Chauvet CaveABCDSection 1Which was not a way humans used fire in the Paleolithic Age? A. Warmth B. LightC. CookingD. Clothing and shelterSection 1-EndSection 2-Main IdeaThe BIG IdeaIdeas, Beliefs, and Values Systematic agriculture brought huge economic, political, and social changes for early humans. Section 2-Key TermsContent Vocabularysystematic agriculture domesticationartisanculture civilizationmonarchpriestAcademic VocabularyrevolutionroleSection 2-Key TermsPeople and PlacesNeolithic RevolutionMesoamericansÇatalhüyükBronze Age Iron AgeABSection 2-Polling QuestionDo you agree that the Neolithic Revolution was a revolutionary change? A. YesB. NoSection 2The Neolithic RevolutionCivilization developed from the agricultural revolution of the Neolithic Age.Section 2The Neolithic Revolution was marked by the shift from hunting of animals and gathering of food to systematic agriculture.During the Neolithic Age (8000 to 4000 B.C.) humans began planting crops. The domestication of animals also occurred during this period.The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)Number of Farms in the U.S., 1940–2004Section 2Spread of agriculture around the world:8000 B.C.: People in Southwest Asia grew wheat and barley and domesticated pigs, cows, goats, and sheep.7000 B.C.: Mesoamericans in the Western Hemisphere grew beans, squash, and maize. They domesticated dogs and fowl.The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)Spread of FarmingSection 26000 B.C.: In Africa, people grew wheat, barley, yams, and bananas. 5000 B.C.: In China, farmers grew rice and domesticated dogs and pigs.The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)As a result of a steady food supply, Neolithic people began living in settled communities, called Neolithic farming villages. Section 2In Çatalhüyük, people were able to enter other occupations other than farming. Skilled workers, such as artisans, made weapons and jewelry and traded them with neighboring people.The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)Section 2Effects of the Neolithic Revolution:A surplus of food encouraged trade and the division of labor.Skilled workers, such as artisans, began to emerge. They developed more refined tools, weapons, and farming techniques.The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)Section 2Roles of men and women changed. When men’s jobs took them away from settlements, women stayed behind to raise children. Men began to play a more dominant role.Villages developed into more complex and wealthy societies. To protect their wealth, they built armies and city walls. These farming villages led to the development of cities.The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)Section 2Discovery of how to make metal tools brought an end to the Neolithic Age, which was followed by the Bronze Age and the Iron Age. The Neolithic Revolution (cont.)ABCDSection 2Which of the following would not have been found in Neolithic societies? A. Weapons and jewelry B. Sickles and hoes for farmingC. Flax and cotton for clothingD. Bronze and iron toolsSection 2Civilization Emerges Some villages grew into cities and became early civilizations.Section 2A civilization is a complex culture in which large numbers of human beings who share a number of common elements live together.Civilization Emerges (cont.)Section 2Common characteristics of the new civilizations: Cities first developed in river valleys. Large-scale farming was needed to feed a large population.Governments were developed to maintain the food supply, protect the population, and organize and regulate human activity. They were usually led by monarchs.Civilization Emerges (cont.)Section 2Religions were developed to explain the forces of nature and their roles in the world. Priests supervised rituals and became very important people.Social structures arose based on economic power. There were an upper class of rulers, priests, and warriors; a middle class of free people, farmers, and artisans; and a slave class.Civilization Emerges (cont.)Section 2Writing was developed for record keeping and creative expression.Significant architecture, paintings, and sculptures were seen in new civilizations.Civilization Emerges (cont.)ABCDSection 2Which of the following is not a geographic area where the earliest civilizations developed? A. Egypt B. EnglandC. IndiaD. MesopotamiaSection 2-EndVS 1VS 2VS 3VS-EndFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Chapter Trans MenuChapter Transparencies MenuChapter Transparency Unit Time Line Transparency Cause-and-Effect Transparency Select a transparency to view.Chapter TransUnit Timeline TransCnETransDFS Trans 1DFS Trans 2Vocab1prehistorythe period before writing was developed Vocab2archaeologythe study of past societies through an analysis of the items people left behind them Vocab3artifacttools, pottery, paintings, weapons, buildings, and household items left behind by early people Vocab4anthropologythe study of human life and culture based on artifacts and human fossils Vocab5fossila remnant or impression of an organism from a past geologic age that has been preserved in the earth’s crust Vocab6hominidhumans and other humanlike creatures that walk upright Vocab7Australopithecusthe earliest humanlike creature that flourished in eastern and southern Africa 3 to 4 million years ago Vocab8Homo sapiens sapiens“wise, wise human,” a species that appeared in Africa between 150,000 and 200,000 years ago; they were the first anatomically modern humans Vocab9“out-of-Africa” theoryalso called the replacement theory; this theory refers to when homo sapiens sapiens began spreading out of Africa to other parts of the world about 100,000 years ago and replacing populations of earlier hominids in Europe and Asia Vocab10theoryhypothesis or unproved assumption Vocab11surviveto remain alive or in existenceVocab12systematic agriculturethe keeping of animals and the growing of food on a regular basis Vocab13domesticationadaptation for human use Vocab14artisana skilled worker who makes products such as weapons and jewelry Vocab15culturethe way of life a people follows Vocab16civilizationa complex culture in which large numbers of people share a number of common elements such as social structure, religion, and artVocab17monarcha king or queen who rules a kingdom by organizing armies to protect their populations and making laws to regulate subjects’ lives Vocab18priestin early urban civilizations, an important and powerful person who supervised rituals aimed at pleasing the gods and goddesses Vocab19revolutiona sudden, complete change; an overthrow of government Vocab20rolea socially expected behavior patternHelpClick the Forward button to go to the next slide.Click the Previous button to return to the previous slide.Click the Home button to return to the Chapter Menu. Click the Transparency button from the Chapter Menu, Chapter Introduction slides, or Visual Summary slides to access the transparencies that are relevant to this chapter. From within a section, click on this button to access the relevant Daily Focus Skills Transparency.Click the Return button in a feature to return to the main presentation.Click the History Online button to access online textbook features. Click the Reference Atlas button to access the Interactive Reference Atlas. Click the Exit button or press the Escape key [Esc] to end the slide show.Click the Help button to access this screen.Links to Presentation Plus! features such as Maps in Motion, Graphs in Motion, Charts in Motion, Concepts in Motion, and figures from your textbook are located at the bottom of relevant screens. To use this Presentation Plus! product:End of Custom ShowsThis slide is intentionally blank.

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